Tag Archives: 21 days of prayer and fasting

fasting-2013
21 days of prayer and fasting, Read Everything
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Day Four: Journal Your Journey

How was Day Three? Stay Strong.

One of the most rewarding disciplines you can have in life is a habit of consistent journaling. Some people do it via a blog. Some keep a journal on their Ipad or computer. Some have these colorful pads with multi-colored paper inside. Still others use a regular spiral notebook. It doesn’t matter. What makes the difference is the journaling or writing of your life’s journey.
Many times I’ll look through the past years of my journal and realize how much I’ve forgotten. I didn’t remember the time when God brought a financial miracle into my life. I’d forgotten about the time when this happened or that.
It can be so encouraging.

You can see David kept something like a journal through his song writing.
World changers like George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Ronald Reagan all kept consistent journals or diaries.

In its most simple form, journaling is writing out your time on Earth. You’re spelling out your legacy. It doesn’t have to be lengthy. Sometimes just a sentence will do like, “Nothing happened today.” The important thing is keeping up the habit so when life does become challenging and you need a place to vent, you pick up your pen instead of railing at the first person you see.

A journey you definitely want to remember is this one, your fasting journey. It’s great to write in it every day and watch your progress. While you’re praying, write down anything that comes to your mind as God speaks to your spirit. Write down a key verse while doing your daily Bible reading. It will cause you to look back on this time with great memories.

The journal I have chosen is called Day One Journal. This journal syncs with all my tech devices so I can write wherever I am. It doesn’t matter whether you find something online or write it out by hand. You owe it to your future self to write out the blessings and struggles you face today. It was mean more than you will ever know.

Below is an article from one of the architects of the modern journaling movement. His name is Pastor Wayne Cordeiro. He pastors an amazing church in Hawaii and leads them every year through reading their Bible and journaling every day.

Why Should I Journal?

by: Pastor Wayne Cordeiro

Some people say, “Wayne, I read the Bible, but I don’t journal. Should I journal?”
“Yes.”
“Why?”
Well, partly because in the book of Deuteronomy, God required Israel’s kings to write out all of His Word in their own handwriting, then read, every day, what they had written. He mandated this practice, He says, so that the hearts of the kings might not be lifted up above their fellowman and would not become prideful.

If God made this a daily requirement of Israel’s kings, then I think it’s not too much to ask of the King’s kids. Regular, prayerful time in the Bible keeps our hearts from straying.

How about other reasons? For one thing, journaling will help you when the tests come—and they will.

Also, as a communicator, I counsel people to journal because I know that the more you learn to write, the better your communication will be. You become better able to take tangled thoughts and articulate them. You develop the ability to compose your feelings and ideas in an effective and powerful way. When you’re called upon to stand and speak, you’ll be able to communicate more effectively because you’ve learned to write.

Sir Francis Bacon once said, “Reading maketh a full man; conference maketh a ready man; and writing maketh an exact man.” Today, we’d say that writing makes us more precise thinkers.

As you write, you become a wordsmith: “Hmm, this adjective doesn’t work; this adverb is better; this turn of a phrase is better.” Writing teaches you to do it on the fly. One practical serendipity is that one day, when you begin to speak extemporaneously, you’ll also start to wordsmith on the fly. You’ll say in your head, This phrase works better than that, and this is better than the other. In nanoseconds, you’re wordsmithing. The regular practice of journaling will be a tremendous help in developing your communication skills.

ACTION STEPS:

  • Check online for online journals
  • or Grab a notebook
  • Commit to writing down your journal entry everyday for the remainder of your fast

OTHER RESOURCES:

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fasting-2013
21 days of prayer and fasting
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Day Two: What Fasting Is? What It Is Not

Welcome to Day Two

How did day one go?

During the next 20 days you are going to have a lot questions and experiences with God. Some of the greatest benefits may not happen until after your fast is complete. I can’t wait to hear the stories of how God does amazing things in your personal life, family group, work atmosphere, and beyond.

At Real Life Church, we believe anything you fast can provide spiritual benefit. While fasting is mostly attributed to food, anything you do with a desire to move closer to God will be honored by Him. I personally think it would be easier to fast food for a month rather than go without my coffee and facebook updates. Maybe you’re like me. Anything you cannot do without for even a day might be something your addicted to. Wouldn’t be an awesome thing to tell God, “You’re more important to me than ______ (fill in the blank). Therefore as an act of worship I’m ________ (not going to  drink any caffeine or even look at social media) for 21 days. Instead I’m going to talk to you and drink in your Word.” WOW! Think what that could do for your relationship with God.

ACTION STEP:

Before we go any further, I think’s a good idea to define what fasting is for you and what it is not.
Below is a portion of an article about this whole topic. Check it out then take a few minutes to define exactly what you are fasting, why, and how long.

The rest of this post was taken from the Christianity section of about.com.

What Fasting Is

In many cases, a spiritual fast involves abstaining from food while focusing on prayer. This can mean refraining from snacks between meals, skipping one or two meals a day, abstaining only from certain foods, or a total fast from all food for an entire day or longer.

For medical reasons or personal preference, some people may not be able to fast from food altogether. They may choose to abstain only from certain foods, like sugar or chocolate, or from something other than food. In truth, believers can fast from anything. Doing without something temporarily, such as television or soda, as a way of redirecting our focus from earthly things toward God, can also be considered a spiritual fast.

The Purpose of Spiritual Fasting

While many people fast to lose weight, dieting is not the purpose of a spiritual fast. Instead, fasting provides unique spiritual benefits in the life of the believer.

Fasting requires self-control and discipline as one denies the natural desires of the flesh. During spiritual fasting, the believer’s focus is removed from the physical things of this world and intensely concentrated on God. Put differently, fasting directs our hunger toward God. It clears the mind and body of earthly attentions and draws us close to God. So, as we gain spiritual clarity of thought while fasting, it allows us to hear God more clearly. Fasting also demonstrates a profound need for God’s help and guidance through complete dependence upon him.

What Spiritual Fasting is Not

Spiritual fasting is not a way to earn God’s favor by getting him to do something for us. Rather, the purpose is to produce a transformation in us—a clearer, more focused attention and dependence upon God.

Fasting is never to be a public display of spirituality—it is between you and God alone. In fact, Jesus specifically instructed us in Matthew 6:16-18 to let our fasting be done privately and in humility, else we forfeit the benefits.

While Old Testament fasting was a sign of mourning, New Testament believers were taught to practice fasting with a cheerful attitude.

Lastly, it should be understood, spiritual fasting is never for the purpose of punishing or harming the body.

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